Background: Three-dimensional printing technology is rapidly changing the way we produce all sort of objects, having also included medical applications. We embarked in a pilot study to assess the value of patient-specific 3-D physical manufacturing of spleno-pancreatic anatomy in helping during patient’s counseling and for preoperative planning. Methods: Twelve patients scheduled for a laparoscopic splenectomy underwent contrast CT and subsequent post-processing to create virtual 3-D models of the target anatomy, and 3-D printing of the relative solid objects. The printing process, its cost and encountered problems were monitored and recorded. Patients were asked to rate the value of 3-D objects on a 1–5 scale in facilitating their understanding of the proposed procedure. Also 10 surgical residents were required to evaluate the perceived extra value of 3-D printing in the preoperative planning process. Results: The post-processing analysis required an average of 2; 20 h was needed to physically print each model and 4 additional hours to finalize each object. The cost for the material employed for each object was around 300 euros. Ten patients gave a score of 5, two a score of 4. Six residents gave a score of 5, four a score of 4. Conclusions: Three-dimensional printing is helpful in understanding complex anatomy for educational purposes at all levels. Cost and working time to produce good quality objects are still considerable. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

From CT scanning to 3-D printing technology for the preoperative planning in laparoscopic splenectomy

PIETRABISSA, ANDREA;MARCONI, STEFANIA;CAVAZZI, EMMA;VINCI, ALESSIO;BOTTI, MARTA;AURICCHIO, FERDINANDO
2016-01-01

Abstract

Background: Three-dimensional printing technology is rapidly changing the way we produce all sort of objects, having also included medical applications. We embarked in a pilot study to assess the value of patient-specific 3-D physical manufacturing of spleno-pancreatic anatomy in helping during patient’s counseling and for preoperative planning. Methods: Twelve patients scheduled for a laparoscopic splenectomy underwent contrast CT and subsequent post-processing to create virtual 3-D models of the target anatomy, and 3-D printing of the relative solid objects. The printing process, its cost and encountered problems were monitored and recorded. Patients were asked to rate the value of 3-D objects on a 1–5 scale in facilitating their understanding of the proposed procedure. Also 10 surgical residents were required to evaluate the perceived extra value of 3-D printing in the preoperative planning process. Results: The post-processing analysis required an average of 2; 20 h was needed to physically print each model and 4 additional hours to finalize each object. The cost for the material employed for each object was around 300 euros. Ten patients gave a score of 5, two a score of 4. Six residents gave a score of 5, four a score of 4. Conclusions: Three-dimensional printing is helpful in understanding complex anatomy for educational purposes at all levels. Cost and working time to produce good quality objects are still considerable. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1197348
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