Active thermal imaging is a valuable tool for the nondestructive characterization of the morphological properties and the functional state of biological tissues and synthetic materials. However, state-of-the-art techniques do not typically combine the required high spatial resolution over extended fields of view with the quantification of temperature variations. Here, we demonstrate quantitative far-infrared photo-thermal imaging at sub-diffraction resolution over millimeter-sized fields of view. Our approach combines the sample absorption of modulated raster-scanned laser light with the automated localization of the laser-induced temperature variations imaged by a thermal camera. With temperature increments ∼0.5–5 °C, we achieve a six-time gain with respect to our 350-μm diffraction-limited resolution with proof-of-principle experiments on synthetic samples. We finally demonstrate the biological relevance of sub-diffraction thermal imaging by retrieving temperature-based super-resolution maps of the distribution of Prussian blue nanocubes across explanted murine skin biopsies.

Photo-activated raster scanning thermal imaging at sub-diffraction resolution

Pallavicini P.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Active thermal imaging is a valuable tool for the nondestructive characterization of the morphological properties and the functional state of biological tissues and synthetic materials. However, state-of-the-art techniques do not typically combine the required high spatial resolution over extended fields of view with the quantification of temperature variations. Here, we demonstrate quantitative far-infrared photo-thermal imaging at sub-diffraction resolution over millimeter-sized fields of view. Our approach combines the sample absorption of modulated raster-scanned laser light with the automated localization of the laser-induced temperature variations imaged by a thermal camera. With temperature increments ∼0.5–5 °C, we achieve a six-time gain with respect to our 350-μm diffraction-limited resolution with proof-of-principle experiments on synthetic samples. We finally demonstrate the biological relevance of sub-diffraction thermal imaging by retrieving temperature-based super-resolution maps of the distribution of Prussian blue nanocubes across explanted murine skin biopsies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1309906
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