Blood platelets and resident neurons are fundamentally different cells, with peculiar features in embryological origin, function, and localization. However, they share common characteristics in subcellular organization and in protein composition.1 One of the most intriguing observations is that several proteins are typically expressed in both neurons and circulating platelets. In the latter, their concentrations are unusually high, and they are found to regulate processes such as platelet activation, hemostasis, and thrombosis.

Blood platelets: Circulating mirrors of neurons?

Canobbio, Ilaria
2019

Abstract

Blood platelets and resident neurons are fundamentally different cells, with peculiar features in embryological origin, function, and localization. However, they share common characteristics in subcellular organization and in protein composition.1 One of the most intriguing observations is that several proteins are typically expressed in both neurons and circulating platelets. In the latter, their concentrations are unusually high, and they are found to regulate processes such as platelet activation, hemostasis, and thrombosis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1322749
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