This short narrative review article moves from early papers that described the behaviour of healthy subjects balancing on a motorized platform continuously translating in the antero-posterior direction. Research from the laboratories of two of the authors and related investigations on dynamic balancing behaviour are briefly summarized. More recent findings challenging time-honoured views are considered, such as the statement that vision plays a head-in-space stabilizing role. The time interval to integrate vision or its withdrawal in the balancing pattern is mentioned as well. Similarities and differences between ageing subjects and patients with peripheral or central disorders are concisely reported. The muscle activities recorded during the translation cycles suggest that vision and amplitude changes of the anticipatory postural activities play a predominant role in controlling dynamic balance during prolonged administration of the predictable perturbation. The potential of this paradigm for rehabilitation of balance problems is discussed.

Human balance in response to continuous, predictable translations of the support base: Integration of sensory information, adaptation to perturbations, and the effect of age, neuropathy and Parkinson's disease

Nardone A.;
2019

Abstract

This short narrative review article moves from early papers that described the behaviour of healthy subjects balancing on a motorized platform continuously translating in the antero-posterior direction. Research from the laboratories of two of the authors and related investigations on dynamic balancing behaviour are briefly summarized. More recent findings challenging time-honoured views are considered, such as the statement that vision plays a head-in-space stabilizing role. The time interval to integrate vision or its withdrawal in the balancing pattern is mentioned as well. Similarities and differences between ageing subjects and patients with peripheral or central disorders are concisely reported. The muscle activities recorded during the translation cycles suggest that vision and amplitude changes of the anticipatory postural activities play a predominant role in controlling dynamic balance during prolonged administration of the predictable perturbation. The potential of this paradigm for rehabilitation of balance problems is discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1323066
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