New viscosity experiments at superliquidus temperatures and during cooling at a rate of 10 K/hr have been performed at different shear rates on a synthetic pyroxenite melt. Results revealed that this melt is extremely fluid at temperature between 1646 and 1530 K and measured viscosities are between 2.2 and 7.8 Pa·s. Such very low viscosities allow the lava to flow in turbulent regime as confirmed by the high Reynolds numbers, which are always >2,000. As a consequence, very long distance could be covered by the lava flow. If we consider this studied composition as proxy for Mars lava flows coupled with very high effusion rates, our results might explain the presence of extraordinary large volcanic channels, as recently hypothesized for the Kasei Valles on Mars, even considering that the gravity is approximately one third that of Earth. Few literature data tracking viscosity during cooling are available, and they reported shear thinning effect on different compositions. Our experiments performed at 0.1 and 1 s−1 have shown complex variation in the apparent viscosity, confirming that nonequilibrium rheology represents a still unexplored field of investigation useful to better understand the real geological scenarios occurring in magmatic and volcanic systems.

Viscosity of Pyroxenite Melt and Its Evolution During Cooling

Murri M.;Alvaro M.;Domeneghetti M. C.;
2019

Abstract

New viscosity experiments at superliquidus temperatures and during cooling at a rate of 10 K/hr have been performed at different shear rates on a synthetic pyroxenite melt. Results revealed that this melt is extremely fluid at temperature between 1646 and 1530 K and measured viscosities are between 2.2 and 7.8 Pa·s. Such very low viscosities allow the lava to flow in turbulent regime as confirmed by the high Reynolds numbers, which are always >2,000. As a consequence, very long distance could be covered by the lava flow. If we consider this studied composition as proxy for Mars lava flows coupled with very high effusion rates, our results might explain the presence of extraordinary large volcanic channels, as recently hypothesized for the Kasei Valles on Mars, even considering that the gravity is approximately one third that of Earth. Few literature data tracking viscosity during cooling are available, and they reported shear thinning effect on different compositions. Our experiments performed at 0.1 and 1 s−1 have shown complex variation in the apparent viscosity, confirming that nonequilibrium rheology represents a still unexplored field of investigation useful to better understand the real geological scenarios occurring in magmatic and volcanic systems.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1352495
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