Increasing evidence supports a close relationship between Ras-ERK1/2 activation in the striatum and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). ERK1/2 activation by L-DOPA takes place through the crosstalk between D1R/AC/PKA/DARPP-32 pathway and NMDA/Ras pathway. Compelling genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that Ras-ERK1/2 inhibition prevents LID onset and may even revert already established dyskinetic symptoms. However, it is currently unclear whether exacerbation of Ras-ERK1/2 activity in the striatum may further aggravate dyskinesia in experimental animal models. Here we took advantage of two genetic models in which Ras-ERK1/2 signaling is hyperactivated, the Nf1+/− mice, in which the Ras inhibitor neurofibromin is reduced, and the Ras-GRF1 overexpressing (Ras-GRF1 OE) transgenic mice in which a specific neuronal activator of Ras is enhanced. Nf1+/− and Ras-GRF1 OE mice were unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA and treated with an escalating L-DOPA dosing regimen. In addition, a subset of Nf1+/− hemi-parkinsonian animals was also co-treated with the Ras inhibitor lovastatin. Our results revealed that Nf1+/− and Ras-GRF1 OE mice displayed similar dyskinetic symptoms to their wild-type counterparts. This observation was confirmed by the lack of differences between mutant and wild-type mice in striatal molecular changes associated to LID (i.e., FosB, and pERK1/2 expression). Interestingly, attenuation of Ras activity with lovastatin does not weaken dyskinetic symptoms in Nf1+/− mice. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2-signaling activation in dyskinetic animals is maximal and does not require further genetic enhancement in the upstream Ras pathway. However, our data also demonstrate that such a genetic enhancement may reduce the efficacy of anti-dyskinetic drugs like lovastatin.

Genetic enhancement of Ras-ERK pathway does not aggravate L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in mice but prevents the decrease induced by lovastatin

Brambilla R.;
2018

Abstract

Increasing evidence supports a close relationship between Ras-ERK1/2 activation in the striatum and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). ERK1/2 activation by L-DOPA takes place through the crosstalk between D1R/AC/PKA/DARPP-32 pathway and NMDA/Ras pathway. Compelling genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that Ras-ERK1/2 inhibition prevents LID onset and may even revert already established dyskinetic symptoms. However, it is currently unclear whether exacerbation of Ras-ERK1/2 activity in the striatum may further aggravate dyskinesia in experimental animal models. Here we took advantage of two genetic models in which Ras-ERK1/2 signaling is hyperactivated, the Nf1+/− mice, in which the Ras inhibitor neurofibromin is reduced, and the Ras-GRF1 overexpressing (Ras-GRF1 OE) transgenic mice in which a specific neuronal activator of Ras is enhanced. Nf1+/− and Ras-GRF1 OE mice were unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA and treated with an escalating L-DOPA dosing regimen. In addition, a subset of Nf1+/− hemi-parkinsonian animals was also co-treated with the Ras inhibitor lovastatin. Our results revealed that Nf1+/− and Ras-GRF1 OE mice displayed similar dyskinetic symptoms to their wild-type counterparts. This observation was confirmed by the lack of differences between mutant and wild-type mice in striatal molecular changes associated to LID (i.e., FosB, and pERK1/2 expression). Interestingly, attenuation of Ras activity with lovastatin does not weaken dyskinetic symptoms in Nf1+/− mice. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2-signaling activation in dyskinetic animals is maximal and does not require further genetic enhancement in the upstream Ras pathway. However, our data also demonstrate that such a genetic enhancement may reduce the efficacy of anti-dyskinetic drugs like lovastatin.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1372718
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