Betahistine is widely used in the symptomatic treatment of peripheral and central vestibular disorders. However, its remains unknown whether the drug can act directly on inner ear sensory organs. To this end, the effects of betahistine (10(-7)-10(-2) M) were examined on isolated preparations of frog semicircular canal mounted in a double-celled bath which allowed drug administration both in the endolymphatic and in the perilymphatic fluid. The effects of betahistine were evaluated by recording ampullar receptor potentials and nerve firing rate both at rest and during mechanical stimulation of the isolated preparation. The results demonstrated that endolymphatic administration of betahistine had no effect, whereas its perilymphatic administration could reduce greatly ampullar receptor resting discharge but had little effect on mechanically evoked responses. This observation may explain the anti-vertigo effects of betahistine. Vertigo is normally due to uncontrolled changes in vestibular receptor resting discharge. It is therefore probable that any factor able to reduce the resting firing rate of vestibular receptors and, in consequence, its variations, may have an anti-vertigo action.

Effects of betahistine on vestibular receptors of the frog.

BOTTA, LAURA;MIRA, EUGENIO;PERIN, PAOLA;ZUCCA, GIANPIERO;VALLI, PAOLO
1998-01-01

Abstract

Betahistine is widely used in the symptomatic treatment of peripheral and central vestibular disorders. However, its remains unknown whether the drug can act directly on inner ear sensory organs. To this end, the effects of betahistine (10(-7)-10(-2) M) were examined on isolated preparations of frog semicircular canal mounted in a double-celled bath which allowed drug administration both in the endolymphatic and in the perilymphatic fluid. The effects of betahistine were evaluated by recording ampullar receptor potentials and nerve firing rate both at rest and during mechanical stimulation of the isolated preparation. The results demonstrated that endolymphatic administration of betahistine had no effect, whereas its perilymphatic administration could reduce greatly ampullar receptor resting discharge but had little effect on mechanically evoked responses. This observation may explain the anti-vertigo effects of betahistine. Vertigo is normally due to uncontrolled changes in vestibular receptor resting discharge. It is therefore probable that any factor able to reduce the resting firing rate of vestibular receptors and, in consequence, its variations, may have an anti-vertigo action.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/138045
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