Objectives: Indications for and timing of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) after tetralogy of Fallot repair are controversial. Among magnetic resonance imaging indices proposed to time valve replacement, a right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume index greater than 160 ml/m2 is often used. Recent evidence suggests that this value may still identify patients with irreversible RV dysfunction, thus hindering recovery. Our goal was to define, using intraoperative video kinematic evaluation, whether a relationship exists between timing of PVR and early functional recovery after surgery. Methods: Between November 2016 and November 2018, a total of 12 consecutive patients aged 27.1 ± 19.1 years underwent PVR on average 22.2 ± 13.3 years after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Mean RV end-diastolic volume evident on the magnetic resonance images was 136.9 ± 35.7 ml/m2. Intraoperative cardiac kinematics were assessed by video kinematic evaluation via a high-speed camera acquiring videos at 200 fps before and after valve replacement. Results: Patients presenting with RV end-diastolic volume <147 ml/m2 were significantly younger (11.2 ± 5.0 vs 38.4 ± 17.0; P = 0.005) and had a shorter time interval to valve replacement (11.0 ± 5.2 vs 30.1 ± 11.3; P = 0.03). The entire population showed a moderate correlation among energy expenditure, cardiac fatigue, perimeter of contraction and preoperative RV end-diastolic volume index. Both groups showed a reduction in all kinematic parameters after PVR, but those with end-diastolic volume >147 ml/m2 showed an unpredictable outcome. Conclusions: Video kinematic evaluation provides insight into intraoperative RV recovery in patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR. Accordingly, functional recovery can be expected in patients with preoperative end-diastolic volume <147 ml/m2.

Right ventricular functional recovery depends on timing of pulmonary valve replacement in tetralogy of Fallot: a video kinematic study

Fassina L;
2021

Abstract

Objectives: Indications for and timing of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) after tetralogy of Fallot repair are controversial. Among magnetic resonance imaging indices proposed to time valve replacement, a right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume index greater than 160 ml/m2 is often used. Recent evidence suggests that this value may still identify patients with irreversible RV dysfunction, thus hindering recovery. Our goal was to define, using intraoperative video kinematic evaluation, whether a relationship exists between timing of PVR and early functional recovery after surgery. Methods: Between November 2016 and November 2018, a total of 12 consecutive patients aged 27.1 ± 19.1 years underwent PVR on average 22.2 ± 13.3 years after tetralogy of Fallot repair. Mean RV end-diastolic volume evident on the magnetic resonance images was 136.9 ± 35.7 ml/m2. Intraoperative cardiac kinematics were assessed by video kinematic evaluation via a high-speed camera acquiring videos at 200 fps before and after valve replacement. Results: Patients presenting with RV end-diastolic volume <147 ml/m2 were significantly younger (11.2 ± 5.0 vs 38.4 ± 17.0; P = 0.005) and had a shorter time interval to valve replacement (11.0 ± 5.2 vs 30.1 ± 11.3; P = 0.03). The entire population showed a moderate correlation among energy expenditure, cardiac fatigue, perimeter of contraction and preoperative RV end-diastolic volume index. Both groups showed a reduction in all kinematic parameters after PVR, but those with end-diastolic volume >147 ml/m2 showed an unpredictable outcome. Conclusions: Video kinematic evaluation provides insight into intraoperative RV recovery in patients with tetralogy of Fallot undergoing PVR. Accordingly, functional recovery can be expected in patients with preoperative end-diastolic volume <147 ml/m2.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1387774
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