Objective: To examine changes in prevalence of overeating behaviors in a comparative effectiveness study of two pediatric weight management interventions. Methods: Four-hundred and seven children, ages 6-12 years, with a BMI ≥ 85th percentile were enrolled in a comparative effectiveness trial of two pediatric weight management interventions. Prevalence of "sneaking, hiding or hoarding food", and 'eating in the absence of hunger' was evaluated at baseline and 12 months. Statistical methods included McNemar's test and longitudinal logistic regression. Results: Prevalence of "sneak, hide, or hoard food" significantly decreased in all participants from 29.1% to 20.7% at 12 months. The prevalence of "eating in the absence of hunger" decreased in all participants from 46.7% to 22.4% at 12 months. Use of SNAP benefits, free/reduced meals at school, parental stress, housing, and food insecurity at baseline were associated with an increased likelihood of endorsing overeating behaviors at 12 months. Conversely, those who engaged in at least one session of the pediatric weight management intervention were significantly less likely to endorse "eating in the absence of hunger" at 12 months. Conclusions: Participation in pediatric weight management interventions improves the prevalence of overeating behaviors and is associated with participant engagement and social determinants of health, specifically food security status. Efforts to engage populations impacted by food insecurity and other social determinants of health risk factors will be critical for success of weight management interventions.

Pediatric weight management interventions improve prevalence of overeating behaviors

Cena H;Portale S;Raspini B;Fiechtner L.
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Objective: To examine changes in prevalence of overeating behaviors in a comparative effectiveness study of two pediatric weight management interventions. Methods: Four-hundred and seven children, ages 6-12 years, with a BMI ≥ 85th percentile were enrolled in a comparative effectiveness trial of two pediatric weight management interventions. Prevalence of "sneaking, hiding or hoarding food", and 'eating in the absence of hunger' was evaluated at baseline and 12 months. Statistical methods included McNemar's test and longitudinal logistic regression. Results: Prevalence of "sneak, hide, or hoard food" significantly decreased in all participants from 29.1% to 20.7% at 12 months. The prevalence of "eating in the absence of hunger" decreased in all participants from 46.7% to 22.4% at 12 months. Use of SNAP benefits, free/reduced meals at school, parental stress, housing, and food insecurity at baseline were associated with an increased likelihood of endorsing overeating behaviors at 12 months. Conversely, those who engaged in at least one session of the pediatric weight management intervention were significantly less likely to endorse "eating in the absence of hunger" at 12 months. Conclusions: Participation in pediatric weight management interventions improves the prevalence of overeating behaviors and is associated with participant engagement and social determinants of health, specifically food security status. Efforts to engage populations impacted by food insecurity and other social determinants of health risk factors will be critical for success of weight management interventions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1447037
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