Wood decay fungi (WDF) seem to be particularly suitable for developing myco-materials due to their mycelial texture, ease of cultivation, and lack of sporification. This study focused on a collection of WDF strains that were later used to develop mycelium mats of leather-like materials. Twenty-one WDF strains were chosen based on the color, homogeneity, and consistency of the mycelia. The growth rate of each strain was measured. To improve the consistency and thickness of the mats, an exclusive method (newly patented) was developed. The obtained materials and the corresponding pure mycelia grown in liquid culture were analyzed by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the principal components and texture. TGA provided a semi-quantitative indication on the mycelia and mat composition, but it was hardly able to discriminate differences in the production process (liquid culture versus patented method). SEM provided keen insight on the mycelial microstructure as well as that of the mat without considering the composition; however, it was able to determine the hyphae and porosity dimensions. Although not exhaustive, TGA and SEM are complementary methods that can be used to characterize fungal strains based on their desirable features for various applications in bio-based materials. Taking all of the results into account, the Fomitopsis iberica strain seems to be the most suitable for the development of leather-like materials.

Collection and Characterization of Wood Decay Fungal Strains for Developing Pure Mycelium Mats

Marco Cartabia
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Carolina Elena Girometta
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Chiara Milanese
Supervision
;
Rebecca Michela Baiguera
Investigation
;
Simone Buratti
Investigation
;
Diego Savio Branciforti
Investigation
;
Dhanalakshmi Vadivel
Methodology
;
Alessandro Girella
Methodology
;
Elena Savino
Conceptualization
;
Daniele Dondi
Project Administration
2021-01-01

Abstract

Wood decay fungi (WDF) seem to be particularly suitable for developing myco-materials due to their mycelial texture, ease of cultivation, and lack of sporification. This study focused on a collection of WDF strains that were later used to develop mycelium mats of leather-like materials. Twenty-one WDF strains were chosen based on the color, homogeneity, and consistency of the mycelia. The growth rate of each strain was measured. To improve the consistency and thickness of the mats, an exclusive method (newly patented) was developed. The obtained materials and the corresponding pure mycelia grown in liquid culture were analyzed by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate the principal components and texture. TGA provided a semi-quantitative indication on the mycelia and mat composition, but it was hardly able to discriminate differences in the production process (liquid culture versus patented method). SEM provided keen insight on the mycelial microstructure as well as that of the mat without considering the composition; however, it was able to determine the hyphae and porosity dimensions. Although not exhaustive, TGA and SEM are complementary methods that can be used to characterize fungal strains based on their desirable features for various applications in bio-based materials. Taking all of the results into account, the Fomitopsis iberica strain seems to be the most suitable for the development of leather-like materials.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1447396
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