Early noninvasive reliable biomarkers are among the major unmet needs in Parkinson’s disease (PD) to monitor therapy response and disease progression. Objective measures of motor performances could allow phenotyping of subtle, undetectable, early stage motor impairments of PD patients. This work aims at identifying prognostic biomarkers in newly diagnosed PD patients and quantifying therapy-response. Forty de novo PD patients underwent clinical and technology-based kinematic assessments performing motor tasks (MDS-UPDRS part III) to assess tremor, bradykinesia, gait, and postural stability (T0). A visit after 6 months (T1) and a clinical and kinematic assessment after 12 months (T2) where scheduled. A clinical follow-up was provided between 30 and 36 months after the diagnosis (T3). We performed an ANOVA for repeated measures to compare patients’ kinematic features at baseline and at T2 to assess therapy response. Pearson correlation test was run between baseline kinematic features and UPDRS III score variation between T0 and T3, to select candidate kinematic prognostic biomarkers. A multiple linear regression model was created to predict the long-term motor outcome using T0 kinematic measures. All motor tasks significantly improved after the dopamine replacement therapy. A significant correlation was found between UPDRS scores variation and some baseline bradykinesia (toe tapping amplitude decrement, p = 0.009) and gait features (velocity of arms and legs, sit-to-stand time, p = 0.007; p = 0.009; p = 0.01, respectively). A linear regression model including four baseline kinematic features could significantly predict the motor outcome (p = 0.000214). Technology-based objective measures represent possible early and reproducible therapy-response and prognostic biomarkers.

Technology-based therapy-response and prognostic biomarkers in a prospective study of a de novo Parkinson’s disease cohort

Pisani A.
2021

Abstract

Early noninvasive reliable biomarkers are among the major unmet needs in Parkinson’s disease (PD) to monitor therapy response and disease progression. Objective measures of motor performances could allow phenotyping of subtle, undetectable, early stage motor impairments of PD patients. This work aims at identifying prognostic biomarkers in newly diagnosed PD patients and quantifying therapy-response. Forty de novo PD patients underwent clinical and technology-based kinematic assessments performing motor tasks (MDS-UPDRS part III) to assess tremor, bradykinesia, gait, and postural stability (T0). A visit after 6 months (T1) and a clinical and kinematic assessment after 12 months (T2) where scheduled. A clinical follow-up was provided between 30 and 36 months after the diagnosis (T3). We performed an ANOVA for repeated measures to compare patients’ kinematic features at baseline and at T2 to assess therapy response. Pearson correlation test was run between baseline kinematic features and UPDRS III score variation between T0 and T3, to select candidate kinematic prognostic biomarkers. A multiple linear regression model was created to predict the long-term motor outcome using T0 kinematic measures. All motor tasks significantly improved after the dopamine replacement therapy. A significant correlation was found between UPDRS scores variation and some baseline bradykinesia (toe tapping amplitude decrement, p = 0.009) and gait features (velocity of arms and legs, sit-to-stand time, p = 0.007; p = 0.009; p = 0.01, respectively). A linear regression model including four baseline kinematic features could significantly predict the motor outcome (p = 0.000214). Technology-based objective measures represent possible early and reproducible therapy-response and prognostic biomarkers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1450067
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