Formed by Diomede Carafa in the second half of the 15th century and carefully arranged in the courtyard and in the interior of his Palace in Naples, this outstanding collection of antiquities has been recently and carefully investigated: a considerable part of its contents has therefore been identified, but much is still lacking. This study allows us to identify three new sculptures so far untraced and provides new evidence on their provenance and antiquarian history. A statue of a draped woman, mentioned in 16th century epigraphic sylloges, seems to correspond to the so-called ‘Trentham Lady’, now in the British Museum, whose inscription was probably misinterpreted. An Italian 16th century drawing in Hamburg depicts the Trentham Lady with a second female statue, now lost but still documented at the beginning of the 20th century in the Vesuvian villa of Francesco Santangelo, who around 1815 had bought Diomede’s palace. As to the curious and much appreciated relief of Tempus I suggest an identification with the Chronos/Tempus relief now in the Hermitage Museum.

Aggiunte alla collezione di Diomede Carafa

Anna Maria Riccomini
2022-01-01

Abstract

Formed by Diomede Carafa in the second half of the 15th century and carefully arranged in the courtyard and in the interior of his Palace in Naples, this outstanding collection of antiquities has been recently and carefully investigated: a considerable part of its contents has therefore been identified, but much is still lacking. This study allows us to identify three new sculptures so far untraced and provides new evidence on their provenance and antiquarian history. A statue of a draped woman, mentioned in 16th century epigraphic sylloges, seems to correspond to the so-called ‘Trentham Lady’, now in the British Museum, whose inscription was probably misinterpreted. An Italian 16th century drawing in Hamburg depicts the Trentham Lady with a second female statue, now lost but still documented at the beginning of the 20th century in the Vesuvian villa of Francesco Santangelo, who around 1815 had bought Diomede’s palace. As to the curious and much appreciated relief of Tempus I suggest an identification with the Chronos/Tempus relief now in the Hermitage Museum.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1453565
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