The archaeological area "Quattro Dossi" represents one of the most important protohistoric sites in Valle Camonica (BS). Discovered in the 1950s, and excavated in 1962 (dir. E. Anati), the small hill of Dos dell'Arca is the southernmost and the most well-known of the four rocky hills comprising the whole site. The excavations carried out in 1962 at Dos dell'Arca revealed evidence of the first human frequentation in the area, dating back to the Late Neolithic / Early Copper Age, as well as later phases of stable human presence in Middle-Late Bronze Age - the "Terramare" culture- and in the Late Iron Age, displaying cultural features of key importance to the alpine area of Lombardy. At this site 11 rock surfaces with prehistoric engravings were also documented. The engraved figures date to two main periods: the Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic and the Iron Age, and are of great iconographic interest, especially considering three of them were found below archaeological context. Thanks to a survey project carried out from 2015 to 2017 by the University of Pavia in collaboration with Soprintendenza Archeologia della Lombardia, several new engraved rocks have been discovered in the "Quattro Dossi" area. This paper presents the new findings in Dos dell'Arca, amounting to a total of 24 new engraved rocks, all located around the perimeter of the previous excavations. Of these rocks, three are fully documented: n. 24 - sector A displays scenes of major interest to the iconography of the Irn Age, with a peculiar depiction of a single-pillared hut, animals, warriors and horsemen carrying shields, spears and swords, while in sector B there is a geometric configuration of lines and shapes generally believed to be "topographical" and dated to the Late Neolithic or Early Copper Age. Rock 28, datable to the Iron Age, shows a huge anthropomorphic figure with arms held high and what appears to be a helmet, below two figures of palette, a symbol often related to funerary practices, while Rock 33 only presents geometric elements, abstract motifs usually dated to Late Neolithic/Early Copper Age.

Nuove ricerche archeologiche a Capo di Ponte (Valle Camonica, BS): Dos dell'Arca e l'area dei "Quattro Dossi".

Paolo Rondini
;
Alberto Marretta
;
2018

Abstract

The archaeological area "Quattro Dossi" represents one of the most important protohistoric sites in Valle Camonica (BS). Discovered in the 1950s, and excavated in 1962 (dir. E. Anati), the small hill of Dos dell'Arca is the southernmost and the most well-known of the four rocky hills comprising the whole site. The excavations carried out in 1962 at Dos dell'Arca revealed evidence of the first human frequentation in the area, dating back to the Late Neolithic / Early Copper Age, as well as later phases of stable human presence in Middle-Late Bronze Age - the "Terramare" culture- and in the Late Iron Age, displaying cultural features of key importance to the alpine area of Lombardy. At this site 11 rock surfaces with prehistoric engravings were also documented. The engraved figures date to two main periods: the Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic and the Iron Age, and are of great iconographic interest, especially considering three of them were found below archaeological context. Thanks to a survey project carried out from 2015 to 2017 by the University of Pavia in collaboration with Soprintendenza Archeologia della Lombardia, several new engraved rocks have been discovered in the "Quattro Dossi" area. This paper presents the new findings in Dos dell'Arca, amounting to a total of 24 new engraved rocks, all located around the perimeter of the previous excavations. Of these rocks, three are fully documented: n. 24 - sector A displays scenes of major interest to the iconography of the Irn Age, with a peculiar depiction of a single-pillared hut, animals, warriors and horsemen carrying shields, spears and swords, while in sector B there is a geometric configuration of lines and shapes generally believed to be "topographical" and dated to the Late Neolithic or Early Copper Age. Rock 28, datable to the Iron Age, shows a huge anthropomorphic figure with arms held high and what appears to be a helmet, below two figures of palette, a symbol often related to funerary practices, while Rock 33 only presents geometric elements, abstract motifs usually dated to Late Neolithic/Early Copper Age.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1459613
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