Background: Patients with COVID-19 may experience hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure (hARF) requiring O-2-therapy by High-Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNO). Although Prone Positioning (PP) may improve oxygenation in COVID-19 non-intubated patients, the results on its clinical efficacy are controversial. The present study aims to prospectively investigate whether PP may reduce the need for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with COVID-19 receiving HFNO. Methods: All consecutive unselected adult patients with bilateral lung opacities on chest X-ray receiving HFNO after admission to a SARS-CoV-2 Respiratory Intermediate Care Unit (RICU) were considered eligible. Patients who successfully passed an initial PP trial (success group) underwent PP for periods >= 2 h twice a day, while receiving HFNO. The study's primary endpoint was the intubation rate during the stay in the RICU. Results: Ninety-three patients were included in the study. PP was feasible and safe in 50 (54%) patients. Sixteen (17.2%) patients received ETI and 27 (29%) escalated respiratory support, resulting in a mortality rate of 9/93 (9.7%). The length of hospital stay was 18 (6-75) days. In 41/50 (80%) of subjects who passed the trial and underwent PP, its use was associated with clinical benefit and survival without escalation of therapy. Conclusions: PP is feasible and safe in over 50% of COVID-19 patients receiving HFNO for hARF. Randomized trials are required to confirm that PP has the potential to reduce intubation rate.

Prone positioning is safe and may reduce the rate of intubation in selected covid-19 patients receiving high-flow nasal oxygen therapy

Turato C.
Investigation
;
Masiero S.;
2021

Abstract

Background: Patients with COVID-19 may experience hypoxemic Acute Respiratory Failure (hARF) requiring O-2-therapy by High-Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNO). Although Prone Positioning (PP) may improve oxygenation in COVID-19 non-intubated patients, the results on its clinical efficacy are controversial. The present study aims to prospectively investigate whether PP may reduce the need for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with COVID-19 receiving HFNO. Methods: All consecutive unselected adult patients with bilateral lung opacities on chest X-ray receiving HFNO after admission to a SARS-CoV-2 Respiratory Intermediate Care Unit (RICU) were considered eligible. Patients who successfully passed an initial PP trial (success group) underwent PP for periods >= 2 h twice a day, while receiving HFNO. The study's primary endpoint was the intubation rate during the stay in the RICU. Results: Ninety-three patients were included in the study. PP was feasible and safe in 50 (54%) patients. Sixteen (17.2%) patients received ETI and 27 (29%) escalated respiratory support, resulting in a mortality rate of 9/93 (9.7%). The length of hospital stay was 18 (6-75) days. In 41/50 (80%) of subjects who passed the trial and underwent PP, its use was associated with clinical benefit and survival without escalation of therapy. Conclusions: PP is feasible and safe in over 50% of COVID-19 patients receiving HFNO for hARF. Randomized trials are required to confirm that PP has the potential to reduce intubation rate.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1459767
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