Fractures of femur proximal extremity (FFPE) are the most common fragility fractures requiring hospitalization, with a high risk of mortality, low independence in the activities of daily living and severe consequences on health-related quality of life. Timing for surgery has a key role in the management of elderly patients with FFPE as recommended by the Australian and New Zealand guidelines and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Early surgery (within 48 h from hospital admission) allows significant benefits in terms of lower rates of postoperative complications and risk of death and can provide better functional outcomes. Therefore, time for surgery could be considered as a comorbidity marker. The choice between conservative or surgical approach surprisingly seems to be still not strongly supported by available literature, but it seems that both 30 d and 1 year risk of mortality is higher with the conservative treatment rather than with surgery. In light of these considerations, the optimization of FFPE management care is mandatory to improve functional outcomes and to reduce sanitary costs. Albeit it is widely accepted that transdisciplinary approach to patients suffering from FFPE is mandatory to optimize both short-term and long-term outcomes, the feasibility of a comprehensive approach in clinical practice is still a challenge. In particular, the large variability of figures involved could be considered both a resource and an additional disadvantage taking into account the difficulty to coordinate multidisciplinary approach covering care in all settings. Therefore, the aim of the present article was to summarize current evidence supporting transdisciplinary management of patients with FFPE, highlighting the benefits, feasibility and limitations of this approach.

Optimization of transdisciplinary management of elderly with femur proximal extremity fracture: A patient-tailored plan from orthopaedics to rehabilitation

Grassi, Federico;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Fractures of femur proximal extremity (FFPE) are the most common fragility fractures requiring hospitalization, with a high risk of mortality, low independence in the activities of daily living and severe consequences on health-related quality of life. Timing for surgery has a key role in the management of elderly patients with FFPE as recommended by the Australian and New Zealand guidelines and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Early surgery (within 48 h from hospital admission) allows significant benefits in terms of lower rates of postoperative complications and risk of death and can provide better functional outcomes. Therefore, time for surgery could be considered as a comorbidity marker. The choice between conservative or surgical approach surprisingly seems to be still not strongly supported by available literature, but it seems that both 30 d and 1 year risk of mortality is higher with the conservative treatment rather than with surgery. In light of these considerations, the optimization of FFPE management care is mandatory to improve functional outcomes and to reduce sanitary costs. Albeit it is widely accepted that transdisciplinary approach to patients suffering from FFPE is mandatory to optimize both short-term and long-term outcomes, the feasibility of a comprehensive approach in clinical practice is still a challenge. In particular, the large variability of figures involved could be considered both a resource and an additional disadvantage taking into account the difficulty to coordinate multidisciplinary approach covering care in all settings. Therefore, the aim of the present article was to summarize current evidence supporting transdisciplinary management of patients with FFPE, highlighting the benefits, feasibility and limitations of this approach.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1461434
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