Concussion pathophysiology in humans remains incompletely understood. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has identified microstructural abnormalities in otherwise normal appearing brain tissue, using measures of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). The results of prior DTI studies suggest that acute alterations in microstructure persist beyond medical clearance to return to play (RTP), but these measures lack specificity. To better understand the observed effects, this study combined DTI with neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), which employs a more sophisticated description of water diffusion in the brain. A total of 66 athletes were recruited, including 33 concussed athletes, scanned within 7 days after concussion and at RTP, along with 33 matched controls. Both univariate and multivariate methods identified DTI and NODDI parameters showing effects of concussion on white matter. Spatially extensive decreases in FA and increases in AD and RD were associated with reduced intra-neurite water volume, at both the symptomatic phase of injury and RTP, indicating that effects persist beyond medical clearance. Subsequent analyses also demonstrated that concussed athletes with higher symptom burden and a longer recovery time had greater reductions in FA and increased AD, RD, along with increased neurite dispersion. This study provides the first longitudinal evaluation of concussion from acute injury to RTP using combined DTI and NODDI, significantly enhancing our understanding of the effects of concussion on white matter microstructure.

White matter during concussion recovery: Comparing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI)

Caverzasi, Eduardo;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Concussion pathophysiology in humans remains incompletely understood. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has identified microstructural abnormalities in otherwise normal appearing brain tissue, using measures of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). The results of prior DTI studies suggest that acute alterations in microstructure persist beyond medical clearance to return to play (RTP), but these measures lack specificity. To better understand the observed effects, this study combined DTI with neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), which employs a more sophisticated description of water diffusion in the brain. A total of 66 athletes were recruited, including 33 concussed athletes, scanned within 7 days after concussion and at RTP, along with 33 matched controls. Both univariate and multivariate methods identified DTI and NODDI parameters showing effects of concussion on white matter. Spatially extensive decreases in FA and increases in AD and RD were associated with reduced intra-neurite water volume, at both the symptomatic phase of injury and RTP, indicating that effects persist beyond medical clearance. Subsequent analyses also demonstrated that concussed athletes with higher symptom burden and a longer recovery time had greater reductions in FA and increased AD, RD, along with increased neurite dispersion. This study provides the first longitudinal evaluation of concussion from acute injury to RTP using combined DTI and NODDI, significantly enhancing our understanding of the effects of concussion on white matter microstructure.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1462267
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