Simple Summary Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring BRAF non-V600 alterations constitute a heterogeneous and poorly studied population orphan of targeted therapies. We conducted a systematic review to detect all BRAF alterations of defined functional class across different cancer types. Then, we searched for NSCLC patients harboring these alterations in the cancer bioportal and in POPLAR and OAK trials using patient-level data, to investigate clinical and genomic differences associated with each BRAF functional class and the prognostic impact of BRAF non-V600 mutations. We found that NSCLC patients harboring distinct classes of BRAF alterations have different clinical characteristics, clinical features and genomic landscape. Moreover, BRAF non-V600 alterations were associated with a poor prognostic impact, apparently regardless of the treatment received. These peculiar features may suggest the use of tailored treatments according to each class of BRAF alteration. Background: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), BRAF class 1 alterations are effectively targeted by BRAF inhibitors. Conversely, targeted therapies have very low or absent activity in patients carrying class 2 and 3 alterations. The spectrum of BRAF alterations in NSCLC patients, and their accompanying clinical features, genomic landscape and treatment outcomes have been poorly reported. Patients and methods: We identified BRAF alterations of defined functional class across different tumors through a systematic review. Then, we selected NSCLC patients carrying BRAF alterations, according to the systematic review, in the cBioPortal (cBioPortal cohort) to collect and analyze clinical, biomolecular and survival data. Finally, we identified NSCLC patients carrying BRAF non-V600 mutations enrolled in POPLAR and OAK trials (POPLAR/OAK cohort), extracting clinical and survival data for survival analyses. Results: 100 different BRAF non-V600 alterations were identified through the systematic review. In the cBioPortal cohort (n = 139), patients harboring class 2 and 3 alterations were more frequently smokers and had higher tumor mutational burden compared to those carrying class 1 alterations. The spectrum of most frequently co-altered genes was significantly different between BRAF alterations classes, including SETD2, STK11, POM121L12, MUC16, KEAP1, TERT, TP53 and other genes. In the POPLAR/OAK cohort, patients carrying non-V600 BRAF alterations were characterized by poor prognosis compared to BRAF wild-type patients. Conclusions: Different classes of BRAF alterations confer distinctive clinical features, biomolecular signature and disease behavior to NSCLC patients. Non-V600 alterations are characterized by poor prognosis, but key gene co-alterations involved in cancer cell survival and immune pathways may suggest their potential sensitivity to tailored treatments.

Genomic Landscape, Clinical Features and Outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Harboring BRAF Alterations of Distinct Functional Classes

Palladini, Arianna;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Simple Summary Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring BRAF non-V600 alterations constitute a heterogeneous and poorly studied population orphan of targeted therapies. We conducted a systematic review to detect all BRAF alterations of defined functional class across different cancer types. Then, we searched for NSCLC patients harboring these alterations in the cancer bioportal and in POPLAR and OAK trials using patient-level data, to investigate clinical and genomic differences associated with each BRAF functional class and the prognostic impact of BRAF non-V600 mutations. We found that NSCLC patients harboring distinct classes of BRAF alterations have different clinical characteristics, clinical features and genomic landscape. Moreover, BRAF non-V600 alterations were associated with a poor prognostic impact, apparently regardless of the treatment received. These peculiar features may suggest the use of tailored treatments according to each class of BRAF alteration. Background: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), BRAF class 1 alterations are effectively targeted by BRAF inhibitors. Conversely, targeted therapies have very low or absent activity in patients carrying class 2 and 3 alterations. The spectrum of BRAF alterations in NSCLC patients, and their accompanying clinical features, genomic landscape and treatment outcomes have been poorly reported. Patients and methods: We identified BRAF alterations of defined functional class across different tumors through a systematic review. Then, we selected NSCLC patients carrying BRAF alterations, according to the systematic review, in the cBioPortal (cBioPortal cohort) to collect and analyze clinical, biomolecular and survival data. Finally, we identified NSCLC patients carrying BRAF non-V600 mutations enrolled in POPLAR and OAK trials (POPLAR/OAK cohort), extracting clinical and survival data for survival analyses. Results: 100 different BRAF non-V600 alterations were identified through the systematic review. In the cBioPortal cohort (n = 139), patients harboring class 2 and 3 alterations were more frequently smokers and had higher tumor mutational burden compared to those carrying class 1 alterations. The spectrum of most frequently co-altered genes was significantly different between BRAF alterations classes, including SETD2, STK11, POM121L12, MUC16, KEAP1, TERT, TP53 and other genes. In the POPLAR/OAK cohort, patients carrying non-V600 BRAF alterations were characterized by poor prognosis compared to BRAF wild-type patients. Conclusions: Different classes of BRAF alterations confer distinctive clinical features, biomolecular signature and disease behavior to NSCLC patients. Non-V600 alterations are characterized by poor prognosis, but key gene co-alterations involved in cancer cell survival and immune pathways may suggest their potential sensitivity to tailored treatments.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1467077
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