Background: Advances in technologies, occupational hygiene and increased surveillance have reduced the excess mortality previously found in the construction industry. This study is aimed to evaluate cause-specific mortality in a recent cohort of construction workers. Methods: We carried out a record-linkage cohort study based on the 2011 Italian census and the mortality archives (2012-2015), including 1 068 653 construction workers. We estimated mortality rate ratios (MRR) using Poisson regression models including terms for age and geographic area. Results: Compared with non-manual workers, construction workers showed an excess mortality from all causes (MRR: 1.34), all neoplasms (MRR: 1.30), head and neck (MRR: 2.05), stomach (MRR: 1.56), liver (MRR: 1.62), lung (MRR: 1.80), prostate (MRR: 1.24) and bladder (MRR: 1.60) cancers, respiratory (MRR: 1.41) and liver (MRR: 1.79) diseases, all external causes (MRR: 1.87), falls (MRR: 2.87) and suicide (MRR: 1.58). Compared with manual workers in other industries, construction workers showed excess mortality from prostate (MRR: 1.27) and non-melanoma skin cancers (MRR: 1.95), all external causes (MRR: 1.14), falls (MRR: 1.94) and suicide (MRR: 1.18). Most of this excess mortality disappeared after adjusting for education, with the exception of prostate and non-melanoma skin cancers, all external causes, falls and suicide. Conclusions: Construction workers are at high risk of dying from external causes, while the excess mortality found for several cancers, liver and respiratory diseases may be at least partially due to the high prevalence of low education and unfavorable lifestyle factors. The excess mortality from prostate cancer requires further evaluations.

Mortality among Italian male workers in the construction industry: A census-based cohort study

Bertuccio P.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background: Advances in technologies, occupational hygiene and increased surveillance have reduced the excess mortality previously found in the construction industry. This study is aimed to evaluate cause-specific mortality in a recent cohort of construction workers. Methods: We carried out a record-linkage cohort study based on the 2011 Italian census and the mortality archives (2012-2015), including 1 068 653 construction workers. We estimated mortality rate ratios (MRR) using Poisson regression models including terms for age and geographic area. Results: Compared with non-manual workers, construction workers showed an excess mortality from all causes (MRR: 1.34), all neoplasms (MRR: 1.30), head and neck (MRR: 2.05), stomach (MRR: 1.56), liver (MRR: 1.62), lung (MRR: 1.80), prostate (MRR: 1.24) and bladder (MRR: 1.60) cancers, respiratory (MRR: 1.41) and liver (MRR: 1.79) diseases, all external causes (MRR: 1.87), falls (MRR: 2.87) and suicide (MRR: 1.58). Compared with manual workers in other industries, construction workers showed excess mortality from prostate (MRR: 1.27) and non-melanoma skin cancers (MRR: 1.95), all external causes (MRR: 1.14), falls (MRR: 1.94) and suicide (MRR: 1.18). Most of this excess mortality disappeared after adjusting for education, with the exception of prostate and non-melanoma skin cancers, all external causes, falls and suicide. Conclusions: Construction workers are at high risk of dying from external causes, while the excess mortality found for several cancers, liver and respiratory diseases may be at least partially due to the high prevalence of low education and unfavorable lifestyle factors. The excess mortality from prostate cancer requires further evaluations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1467796
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