Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe personality disorder whose neural bases are still unclear. Indeed, previous studies reported inconsistent findings concerning alterations in cortical and subcortical areas. In the present study, we applied for the first time a combination of an unsupervised machine learning approach known as multimodal canonical correlation analysis plus joint independent component analysis (mCCA+jICA), in combination with a supervised machine learning approach known as random forest, to possibly find covarying gray matter and white matter (GM-WM) circuits that separate BPD from controls and that are also predictive of this diagnosis. The first analysis was used to decompose the brain into independent circuits of covarying grey and white matter concentrations. The second method was used to develop a predictive model able to correctly classify new unobserved BPD cases based on one or more circuits derived from the first analysis. To this aim, we analyzed the structural images of patients with BPD and matched healthy controls (HCs). The results showed that two GM-WM covarying circuits, including basal ganglia, amygdala, and portions of the temporal lobes and of the orbitofrontal cortex, correctly classified BPD against HC. Notably, these circuits are affected by specific child traumatic experiences (emotional and physical neglect, and physical abuse) and predict symptoms severity in the interpersonal and impulsivity domains. These results support that BPD is characterized by anomalies in both GM and WM circuits related to early traumatic experiences and specific symptoms.

Abnormal Brain Circuits Characterize Borderline Personality and Mediate the Relationship between Childhood Traumas and Symptoms: A mCCA+jICA and Random Forest Approach

Salvato, Gerardo;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe personality disorder whose neural bases are still unclear. Indeed, previous studies reported inconsistent findings concerning alterations in cortical and subcortical areas. In the present study, we applied for the first time a combination of an unsupervised machine learning approach known as multimodal canonical correlation analysis plus joint independent component analysis (mCCA+jICA), in combination with a supervised machine learning approach known as random forest, to possibly find covarying gray matter and white matter (GM-WM) circuits that separate BPD from controls and that are also predictive of this diagnosis. The first analysis was used to decompose the brain into independent circuits of covarying grey and white matter concentrations. The second method was used to develop a predictive model able to correctly classify new unobserved BPD cases based on one or more circuits derived from the first analysis. To this aim, we analyzed the structural images of patients with BPD and matched healthy controls (HCs). The results showed that two GM-WM covarying circuits, including basal ganglia, amygdala, and portions of the temporal lobes and of the orbitofrontal cortex, correctly classified BPD against HC. Notably, these circuits are affected by specific child traumatic experiences (emotional and physical neglect, and physical abuse) and predict symptoms severity in the interpersonal and impulsivity domains. These results support that BPD is characterized by anomalies in both GM and WM circuits related to early traumatic experiences and specific symptoms.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1474455
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