Purpose An increase in serum TSH concentrations in the absence of thyroid disease, named isolated hyperthyrotropinemia, is frequently observed in subjects with obesity. It is directly associated with body mass index, and it is reversible following weight loss. Autoimmune hypothyroidism is frequently associated with obesity, it is usually progressive and needs replacement treatment with L-thyroxine. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) to define the thyroidal status in subjects with overweight or obesity. Methods This is a retrospective study including 749 consecutive adult patients with overweight or obesity. Of those, 76 were excluded from the analysis due to hyperthyroidism, previous thyroidectomy or radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism, hemiagenesis or drug-induced hypothyroidism. Serum thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (FT3), TgAb and thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured in all patients. Results Out of 673 patients, 408 did not have thyroid disease. Among patients with thyroid disease (n = 265), 130 had nodular disease with no humoral signs of thyroid autoimmunity and 135 (20%) had autoimmune thyroiditis, defined by the presence of TPOAb and/or TgAb. The prevalence of hyperthyrotropinemia, either directly measured or presumed based on L-thyroxine treatment at the time of data collection, was 63.9% in patients with both TgAb and TPOAb, 47.1% in those with isolated positivity of TPOAb, 42.8% in patients with isolated positivity of TgAb, and 14.5% in those with no detectable TgAb or TPOAb. Conclusions Our results confirm a high prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis (20%) in patients with obesity. TgAb may be associated with hypothyroidism in the absence of TPOAb. TgAb measurement may turn helpful to unravel a proportion of subjects that may have or may develop primary hypothyroidism requiring specific substitutive treatment.

Possible added value of thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) testing in the evaluation of thyroidal status of subjects with overweight or obesity

Rotondi, M;Chiovato, L;Santini, F
2022-01-01

Abstract

Purpose An increase in serum TSH concentrations in the absence of thyroid disease, named isolated hyperthyrotropinemia, is frequently observed in subjects with obesity. It is directly associated with body mass index, and it is reversible following weight loss. Autoimmune hypothyroidism is frequently associated with obesity, it is usually progressive and needs replacement treatment with L-thyroxine. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) to define the thyroidal status in subjects with overweight or obesity. Methods This is a retrospective study including 749 consecutive adult patients with overweight or obesity. Of those, 76 were excluded from the analysis due to hyperthyroidism, previous thyroidectomy or radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism, hemiagenesis or drug-induced hypothyroidism. Serum thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (FT3), TgAb and thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured in all patients. Results Out of 673 patients, 408 did not have thyroid disease. Among patients with thyroid disease (n = 265), 130 had nodular disease with no humoral signs of thyroid autoimmunity and 135 (20%) had autoimmune thyroiditis, defined by the presence of TPOAb and/or TgAb. The prevalence of hyperthyrotropinemia, either directly measured or presumed based on L-thyroxine treatment at the time of data collection, was 63.9% in patients with both TgAb and TPOAb, 47.1% in those with isolated positivity of TPOAb, 42.8% in patients with isolated positivity of TgAb, and 14.5% in those with no detectable TgAb or TPOAb. Conclusions Our results confirm a high prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis (20%) in patients with obesity. TgAb may be associated with hypothyroidism in the absence of TPOAb. TgAb measurement may turn helpful to unravel a proportion of subjects that may have or may develop primary hypothyroidism requiring specific substitutive treatment.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1476692
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