This study explores whether the widespread dissemination of Western-type culture and the globalization of food production and consumption that have characterized Italy for decades may have influenced red and processed meat consumption across generations. For the purpose of our study, we constructed a pseudo-panel derived from repeated cross-sections of the annual household survey, "Aspects of Daily Life," that was part of the Multipurpose Survey carried out by the Italian National Statistical Office (ISTAT) from 1997 to 2012. We adopted an APC (Age, Period, Cohort) approach that involves age, period, and cohort effects. We followed the experiences of four cohorts: the Silent Generation (born 1926-1945), the Baby Boomer 1 Generation (1946-1955), the Baby Boomer 2 Generation (1956-1965), and Generation X (1966-1980). Our results revealed that increases in disposable income, changes in women's role in society, and urbanization and globalization have had significant effects on consumption patterns. The analysis shows that the older generations have changed their diets more in favor of meat consumption than later generations, with more change in the relatively affluent north of the country compared with the south, while the youngest generations are more likely to adopt more healthful and environmentally sustainable eating patterns.

Improving health and sustainability: Patterns of red and processed meat consumption across generations

Cinzia Di Novi
;
Anna Marenzi
2022-01-01

Abstract

This study explores whether the widespread dissemination of Western-type culture and the globalization of food production and consumption that have characterized Italy for decades may have influenced red and processed meat consumption across generations. For the purpose of our study, we constructed a pseudo-panel derived from repeated cross-sections of the annual household survey, "Aspects of Daily Life," that was part of the Multipurpose Survey carried out by the Italian National Statistical Office (ISTAT) from 1997 to 2012. We adopted an APC (Age, Period, Cohort) approach that involves age, period, and cohort effects. We followed the experiences of four cohorts: the Silent Generation (born 1926-1945), the Baby Boomer 1 Generation (1946-1955), the Baby Boomer 2 Generation (1956-1965), and Generation X (1966-1980). Our results revealed that increases in disposable income, changes in women's role in society, and urbanization and globalization have had significant effects on consumption patterns. The analysis shows that the older generations have changed their diets more in favor of meat consumption than later generations, with more change in the relatively affluent north of the country compared with the south, while the youngest generations are more likely to adopt more healthful and environmentally sustainable eating patterns.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1478044
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