Background: To date, there is still a lack of consensus for identifying the ideal candidate for cognitive telerehabilitation (TR). The main goal of the present study is to identify the factors associated to the preference for either TR or in-person cognitive training (CT) programs in older adults at risk of dementia or with early cognitive impairment.Methods: A sample of 56 participants with subjective cognitive decline or neurocognitive disorders eligible for CT were enrolled at the Dementia Research Center and Neurorehabilitation Unit of IRCCS Mondino Foundation. All individuals underwent a baseline assessment to capture their complete profile, including cognitive reserve and lifestyle habits, sociodemographic characteristics, cognitive functioning, and mental health. Patients were then asked their preference for TR or in-person CT, before being randomized to either treatment as per protocol procedures. Statistical analyses included explorative descriptive approach, logistic regression, and non-parametric models to explore the overall contribution of each variable.Results: The two (TR and in-person) preference groups were similar for cognitive functioning and mental health status. Socio-demographic and lifestyle profiles seem to be the most important factors to influence the preference in terms of the area under the curve (AUC) of the models. The two preference groups differed in terms of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., level of technological skills, age, and distance from the clinic). Furthermore, participants who selected the TR modality of CT had significantly higher levels of cognitive reserve and adopted more protective lifestyle habits (e.g., regular physical activity, Mediterranean diet) when compared to those who preferred in-person CT.Discussion: These findings highlight that the preference to receive CT delivered by TR or in person is a complex issue and is influenced by a variety of factors, mostly related to lifestyle habits and sociodemographic characteristics. Availability of profiles of patients that may be more attracted to one or the other modality of TR may help promote shared decision-making to enhance patient experience and outcomes.

In person versus remote cognitive rehabilitation in patients with subjective cognitive decline or neurocognitive disorders: what factors drive patient's preference?

Bernini, Sara;Ballante, Elena;Fassio, Federico;Panzarasa, Silvia;Quaglini, Silvana;Riccietti, Chiara;Costa, Alfredo;Tassorelli, Cristina;Vecchi, Tomaso;Bottiroli, Sara
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: To date, there is still a lack of consensus for identifying the ideal candidate for cognitive telerehabilitation (TR). The main goal of the present study is to identify the factors associated to the preference for either TR or in-person cognitive training (CT) programs in older adults at risk of dementia or with early cognitive impairment.Methods: A sample of 56 participants with subjective cognitive decline or neurocognitive disorders eligible for CT were enrolled at the Dementia Research Center and Neurorehabilitation Unit of IRCCS Mondino Foundation. All individuals underwent a baseline assessment to capture their complete profile, including cognitive reserve and lifestyle habits, sociodemographic characteristics, cognitive functioning, and mental health. Patients were then asked their preference for TR or in-person CT, before being randomized to either treatment as per protocol procedures. Statistical analyses included explorative descriptive approach, logistic regression, and non-parametric models to explore the overall contribution of each variable.Results: The two (TR and in-person) preference groups were similar for cognitive functioning and mental health status. Socio-demographic and lifestyle profiles seem to be the most important factors to influence the preference in terms of the area under the curve (AUC) of the models. The two preference groups differed in terms of socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., level of technological skills, age, and distance from the clinic). Furthermore, participants who selected the TR modality of CT had significantly higher levels of cognitive reserve and adopted more protective lifestyle habits (e.g., regular physical activity, Mediterranean diet) when compared to those who preferred in-person CT.Discussion: These findings highlight that the preference to receive CT delivered by TR or in person is a complex issue and is influenced by a variety of factors, mostly related to lifestyle habits and sociodemographic characteristics. Availability of profiles of patients that may be more attracted to one or the other modality of TR may help promote shared decision-making to enhance patient experience and outcomes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1486655
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