Objectives: To evaluate the rate of postnatal infection during the first month of life in neonates born to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-positive mothers during the predominant circulation of the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant. Methods: This prospective, 10-center study enrolled mothers infected by SARS-CoV-2 at delivery and their infants, if both were eligible for rooming-in, between December 2021 and March 2022. Neonates were screened for SARS-CoV-2 RNA at 1 day of life (DOL), 2 to 3 DOL, before discharge, and twice after hospital discharge. Mother-infant dyads were managed under a standardized protocol to minimize the risk of viral transmission. Sequencing data in the study area were obtained from the Italian Coronavirus Disease 2019 Genomic platform. Neonates were included in the final analysis if they were born when the omicron variant represented >90% of isolates. Results: Eighty-two percent (302/366) of mothers had an asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Among 368 neonates, 1 was considered infected in utero (0.3%), whereas the postnatal infection rate during virtually exclusive circulation of the omicron variant was 12.1%. Among neonates infected after birth, 48.6% became positive during the follow-up period. Most positive cases at follow-up were detected concurrently with the peak of coronavirus disease 2019 cases in Italy. Ninety-seven percent of the infected neonates were asymptomatic. Conclusions: The risk of early postnatal infection by the SARS-CoV-2 omicron variant is higher than that reported for previously circulating variants. However, protected rooming-in practice should still be encouraged given the paucity of symptoms in infected neonates.

Early Postnatal Infection of Neonates Born to Mothers Infected by SARS-CoV-2 Omicron Variant

Ghirardello, Stefano;Martinelli, Stefano;Saruggia, Martina;Piralla, Antonio;Bergami, Federica;Bossi, Angela;Servi, Pierpaolo;Baldanti, Fausto;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the rate of postnatal infection during the first month of life in neonates born to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-positive mothers during the predominant circulation of the omicron (B.1.1.529) variant. Methods: This prospective, 10-center study enrolled mothers infected by SARS-CoV-2 at delivery and their infants, if both were eligible for rooming-in, between December 2021 and March 2022. Neonates were screened for SARS-CoV-2 RNA at 1 day of life (DOL), 2 to 3 DOL, before discharge, and twice after hospital discharge. Mother-infant dyads were managed under a standardized protocol to minimize the risk of viral transmission. Sequencing data in the study area were obtained from the Italian Coronavirus Disease 2019 Genomic platform. Neonates were included in the final analysis if they were born when the omicron variant represented >90% of isolates. Results: Eighty-two percent (302/366) of mothers had an asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Among 368 neonates, 1 was considered infected in utero (0.3%), whereas the postnatal infection rate during virtually exclusive circulation of the omicron variant was 12.1%. Among neonates infected after birth, 48.6% became positive during the follow-up period. Most positive cases at follow-up were detected concurrently with the peak of coronavirus disease 2019 cases in Italy. Ninety-seven percent of the infected neonates were asymptomatic. Conclusions: The risk of early postnatal infection by the SARS-CoV-2 omicron variant is higher than that reported for previously circulating variants. However, protected rooming-in practice should still be encouraged given the paucity of symptoms in infected neonates.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1489109
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