Background and objective: Early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) commonly recognizes a genetic basis; thus, patients with EOPD are often addressed to diagnostic testing based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) of PD-associated multigene panels. However, NGS interpretation can be challenging in a diagnostic setting, and few studies have addressed this issue so far. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from 648 patients with PD with age at onset younger than 55 years who underwent NGS of a minimal shared panel of 15 PD-related genes, as well as PD-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in eight Italian diagnostic laboratories. Data included a minimal clinical dataset, the complete list of variants included in the diagnostic report, and final interpretation (positive/negative/inconclusive). Patients were further stratified based on age at onset ≤40 years (very EOPD, n = 157). All variants were reclassified according to the latest American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics criteria. For classification purposes, PD-associated GBA1 variants were considered diagnostic. Results: In 186 of 648 (29%) patients, the diagnostic report listed at least one variant, and the outcome was considered diagnostic (positive) in 105 (16%). After reanalysis, diagnosis changed in 18 of 186 (10%) patients, with 5 shifting from inconclusive to positive and 13 former positive being reclassified as inconclusive. A definite diagnosis was eventually reached in 97 (15%) patients, of whom the majority carried GBA1 variants or, less frequently, biallelic PRKN variants. In 89 (14%) cases, the genetic report was inconclusive. Conclusions: This study attempts to harmonize reporting of PD genetic testing across several diagnostic labs and highlights current difficulties in interpreting genetic variants emerging from NGS-multigene panels, with relevant implications for counseling. © 2023 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Harmonizing Genetic Testing for Parkinson's Disease: Results of the PARKNET Multicentric Study

Avenali, Micol;Blandini, Fabio;Cuconato, Giada;Giardina, Emiliano;Valente, Enza Maria
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background and objective: Early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD) commonly recognizes a genetic basis; thus, patients with EOPD are often addressed to diagnostic testing based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) of PD-associated multigene panels. However, NGS interpretation can be challenging in a diagnostic setting, and few studies have addressed this issue so far. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from 648 patients with PD with age at onset younger than 55 years who underwent NGS of a minimal shared panel of 15 PD-related genes, as well as PD-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in eight Italian diagnostic laboratories. Data included a minimal clinical dataset, the complete list of variants included in the diagnostic report, and final interpretation (positive/negative/inconclusive). Patients were further stratified based on age at onset ≤40 years (very EOPD, n = 157). All variants were reclassified according to the latest American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics criteria. For classification purposes, PD-associated GBA1 variants were considered diagnostic. Results: In 186 of 648 (29%) patients, the diagnostic report listed at least one variant, and the outcome was considered diagnostic (positive) in 105 (16%). After reanalysis, diagnosis changed in 18 of 186 (10%) patients, with 5 shifting from inconclusive to positive and 13 former positive being reclassified as inconclusive. A definite diagnosis was eventually reached in 97 (15%) patients, of whom the majority carried GBA1 variants or, less frequently, biallelic PRKN variants. In 89 (14%) cases, the genetic report was inconclusive. Conclusions: This study attempts to harmonize reporting of PD genetic testing across several diagnostic labs and highlights current difficulties in interpreting genetic variants emerging from NGS-multigene panels, with relevant implications for counseling. © 2023 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1497638
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