Objectives: Mild cognitive impairment presenting with an amnestic syndrome (aMCI) and amyloid positivity is considered due to AD. Many subjects, however, can show an overall very slow progression relevant for differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This study assessed PET biomarkers, including brain glucose metabolism, tau, and amyloid load, in a series of comparable aMCI at baseline, clinically evaluated at follow-up. Methods: We included 72 aMCI subjects from Geneva Memory Center (N = 31) and ADNI cohorts (N = 41), selected based on available FDG-PET, tau-PET, amyloid-PET, and clinical follow-up (2.3 years ± 1.2). A data-driven algorithm classified brain metabolic patterns into subtypes that were then compared for clinical and PET biomarker measures and cognitive decline. Voxel-wise comparisons were performed both with FDG-PET and tau-PET data. Results: The algorithm classified three metabolic subtypes, namely "Hippocampal-sparing with cortical hypometabolism" (Type1; N = 27), "Hippocampal and cortical hypometabolism" (Type 2; N = 23), and "Medial temporal hypometabolism" (Type 3; N = 22). Amyloid positivity and tau accumulation in the medial temporal and neocortical regions characterized Type 1 and Type 2, whereas Type 3 showed no significant tau pathology, variable amyloid positivity, and stability at follow-up. All tau-positive patients, independently of the FDG-based subtype, showed faster cognitive decline. Interpretation: aMCI subjects can differ in metabolic patterns, tau and amyloid pathology, and clinical progression. Here, we complemented with PET tau biomarker the specific brain hypometabolic patterns at the individual level in the prodromal phase, contributing to the patient's classification. Tau PET is the most accurate biomarker in supporting or excluding the AD diagnosis in aMCI across metabolic subtypes and also predicting the risk of decline.

The diagnostic and prognostic value of tau‐PET in amnestic MCI with different FDG‐PET subtypes

Caminiti, Silvia Paola;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Objectives: Mild cognitive impairment presenting with an amnestic syndrome (aMCI) and amyloid positivity is considered due to AD. Many subjects, however, can show an overall very slow progression relevant for differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This study assessed PET biomarkers, including brain glucose metabolism, tau, and amyloid load, in a series of comparable aMCI at baseline, clinically evaluated at follow-up. Methods: We included 72 aMCI subjects from Geneva Memory Center (N = 31) and ADNI cohorts (N = 41), selected based on available FDG-PET, tau-PET, amyloid-PET, and clinical follow-up (2.3 years ± 1.2). A data-driven algorithm classified brain metabolic patterns into subtypes that were then compared for clinical and PET biomarker measures and cognitive decline. Voxel-wise comparisons were performed both with FDG-PET and tau-PET data. Results: The algorithm classified three metabolic subtypes, namely "Hippocampal-sparing with cortical hypometabolism" (Type1; N = 27), "Hippocampal and cortical hypometabolism" (Type 2; N = 23), and "Medial temporal hypometabolism" (Type 3; N = 22). Amyloid positivity and tau accumulation in the medial temporal and neocortical regions characterized Type 1 and Type 2, whereas Type 3 showed no significant tau pathology, variable amyloid positivity, and stability at follow-up. All tau-positive patients, independently of the FDG-based subtype, showed faster cognitive decline. Interpretation: aMCI subjects can differ in metabolic patterns, tau and amyloid pathology, and clinical progression. Here, we complemented with PET tau biomarker the specific brain hypometabolic patterns at the individual level in the prodromal phase, contributing to the patient's classification. Tau PET is the most accurate biomarker in supporting or excluding the AD diagnosis in aMCI across metabolic subtypes and also predicting the risk of decline.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1498023
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