: Cardiac tissue engineering is a cutting-edge technology aiming to replace irreversibly damaged cardiac tissue and restore contractile functionality. However, cardiac tissue engineering porous and perfusable scaffolds to enable oxygen supply in vitro and eventually promote angiogenesis in vivo are still desirable. Two fully-aliphatic random copolymers of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), poly(butylene succinate/Pripol), P(BSBPripol), and poly(butylene/neopentyl glycol succinate), P(BSNS), containing two different subunits, neopentyl glycol and Pripol 1009, were successfully synthesized and then electrospun in tridimentional fibrous mats. The copolymers show different thermal and mechanical behaviours as result of their chemical structure. In particular, copolymerization led to a reduction in crystallinity and consequently PBS stiffness, reaching values of elastic modulus very close to those of soft tissues. Then, to check the biological suitability, human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) were directly seeded on both PBS-based copolymeric scaffolds. The results confirmed the ability of both the scaffolds to sustain cell viability and to maintain their stemness during cell expansion. Furthermore, gene expression and immunofluorescence analysis showed that P(BSBPripol) scaffold promoted an upregulation of the early cardiac progenitor and later-stage markers with a simultaneously upregulation of HYPPO pathway gene expression, crucial for mechanosensing of cardiac progenitor cells. These results suggest that the correct ad-hoc chemical design and, in turn, the mechanical properties of the matrix, such as substrate stiffness, together with surface porosity, play a critical role in regulating the behaviour of cardiac progenitors, which ultimately offers valuable insights into the development of novel bio-inspired scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration.

The ad hoc chemical design of random PBS-based copolymers influences the activation of cardiac differentiation while altering the HYPPO pathway target genes in hiPSCs

Bloise, Nora;Visai, Livia;Sampaolesi, Maurilio;
2023-01-01

Abstract

: Cardiac tissue engineering is a cutting-edge technology aiming to replace irreversibly damaged cardiac tissue and restore contractile functionality. However, cardiac tissue engineering porous and perfusable scaffolds to enable oxygen supply in vitro and eventually promote angiogenesis in vivo are still desirable. Two fully-aliphatic random copolymers of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), poly(butylene succinate/Pripol), P(BSBPripol), and poly(butylene/neopentyl glycol succinate), P(BSNS), containing two different subunits, neopentyl glycol and Pripol 1009, were successfully synthesized and then electrospun in tridimentional fibrous mats. The copolymers show different thermal and mechanical behaviours as result of their chemical structure. In particular, copolymerization led to a reduction in crystallinity and consequently PBS stiffness, reaching values of elastic modulus very close to those of soft tissues. Then, to check the biological suitability, human induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) were directly seeded on both PBS-based copolymeric scaffolds. The results confirmed the ability of both the scaffolds to sustain cell viability and to maintain their stemness during cell expansion. Furthermore, gene expression and immunofluorescence analysis showed that P(BSBPripol) scaffold promoted an upregulation of the early cardiac progenitor and later-stage markers with a simultaneously upregulation of HYPPO pathway gene expression, crucial for mechanosensing of cardiac progenitor cells. These results suggest that the correct ad-hoc chemical design and, in turn, the mechanical properties of the matrix, such as substrate stiffness, together with surface porosity, play a critical role in regulating the behaviour of cardiac progenitors, which ultimately offers valuable insights into the development of novel bio-inspired scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1498660
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