Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate cell type for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. Exposure of MSCs to physical stimuli favors early and rapid activation of the tissue repair process. In this study we investigated the in vitro effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and adipose-tissue MSCs (ASCs), to assess if both types of MSCs could be indifferently used in combination with PEMF exposure for bone tissue healing. We compared the cell viability, cell matrix distribution, and calcified matrix production in unstimulated and PEMF-stimulated (magnetic field: 2 mT, amplitude: 5 mV) mesenchymal cell lineages. After PEMF exposure, in comparison with ASCs, BM-MSCs showed an increase in cell proliferation (p<0.05) and an enhanced deposition of extracellular matrix components such as decorin, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and type-I and -III collagens (p<0.05). Calcium deposition was 1.5-fold greater in BM-MSC–derived osteoblasts (p<0.05). The immunofluorescence related to the deposition of bone matrix proteins and calcium showed their colocalization to the cell-rich areas for both types of MSC-derived osteoblast. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased nearly 2-fold (p<0.001) and its protein content was 1.2-fold higher in osteoblasts derived from BM-MSCs. The quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed up-regulated transcription specific for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, osteonectin, and Runx2, but at a higher level for cells differentiated from BM-MSCs. All together these results suggest that PEMF promotion of bone extracellular matrix deposition is more efficient in osteoblasts differentiated from BM-MSCs.

A comparative analysis of the in vitro effects of pulsed electromagnetic field treatment on osteogenic differentiation of two different mesenchymal cell lineages

Ceccarelli G;Bloise N;Gastaldi G;Fassina L;Cusella De Angelis MG;Imbriani M;Visai L.
2013-01-01

Abstract

Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate cell type for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. Exposure of MSCs to physical stimuli favors early and rapid activation of the tissue repair process. In this study we investigated the in vitro effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and adipose-tissue MSCs (ASCs), to assess if both types of MSCs could be indifferently used in combination with PEMF exposure for bone tissue healing. We compared the cell viability, cell matrix distribution, and calcified matrix production in unstimulated and PEMF-stimulated (magnetic field: 2 mT, amplitude: 5 mV) mesenchymal cell lineages. After PEMF exposure, in comparison with ASCs, BM-MSCs showed an increase in cell proliferation (p<0.05) and an enhanced deposition of extracellular matrix components such as decorin, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, and type-I and -III collagens (p<0.05). Calcium deposition was 1.5-fold greater in BM-MSC–derived osteoblasts (p<0.05). The immunofluorescence related to the deposition of bone matrix proteins and calcium showed their colocalization to the cell-rich areas for both types of MSC-derived osteoblast. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased nearly 2-fold (p<0.001) and its protein content was 1.2-fold higher in osteoblasts derived from BM-MSCs. The quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed up-regulated transcription specific for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, osteonectin, and Runx2, but at a higher level for cells differentiated from BM-MSCs. All together these results suggest that PEMF promotion of bone extracellular matrix deposition is more efficient in osteoblasts differentiated from BM-MSCs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/701019
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