Micronutrients are involved in nearly all cellular processes, inadequacies or deficiencies may accelerate cellular aging and increase risk for chronic diseases later in life.1 Optimizing micronutrient intake may help reduce the risk for developing certain age-related conditions/diseases, including osteopenia/osteoporosis,2 sarcopenia,3 falls,4 mild cognitive impairment,5 immunosenescence,6 impaired resilience,7 hypertension,8 cataracts,9 and age-related macular degeneration.10 The importance of calcium and vitamin D for maintaining bone health has been established,2 but these micronutrients may also be involved with muscle health and reducing the risk for falls and consequent bone fractures in later life.11 Vitamin D may also be involved in stress management and resilience.12 Vitamins C, D, and E, zinc, selenium, and other micronutrients are necessary for healthy immune system function,13,14 and vitamin E is important for cognition,15 immune competence,16 and eye health.10 Although these micronutrients are individually involved with these processes by acting as antioxidants, hormonal regulators of gene expression, or cofactors in enzymatic reactions, there are also important interactions between micronutrients to consider (eg, calcium/vitamin D in musculoskeletal health). Importantly, a significant proportion of the aging population does not meet the recommended intake of many micronutrients.17 Clinical trials on the benefits of micronutrient supplementation have not been conclusive, but adequate intake should be considered an essential component of comprehensive healthcare for older adults.

The Impact of Micronutrients on Cellular Metabolism and Healthy Aging.

Hellas Cena
Conceptualization
;
2020

Abstract

Micronutrients are involved in nearly all cellular processes, inadequacies or deficiencies may accelerate cellular aging and increase risk for chronic diseases later in life.1 Optimizing micronutrient intake may help reduce the risk for developing certain age-related conditions/diseases, including osteopenia/osteoporosis,2 sarcopenia,3 falls,4 mild cognitive impairment,5 immunosenescence,6 impaired resilience,7 hypertension,8 cataracts,9 and age-related macular degeneration.10 The importance of calcium and vitamin D for maintaining bone health has been established,2 but these micronutrients may also be involved with muscle health and reducing the risk for falls and consequent bone fractures in later life.11 Vitamin D may also be involved in stress management and resilience.12 Vitamins C, D, and E, zinc, selenium, and other micronutrients are necessary for healthy immune system function,13,14 and vitamin E is important for cognition,15 immune competence,16 and eye health.10 Although these micronutrients are individually involved with these processes by acting as antioxidants, hormonal regulators of gene expression, or cofactors in enzymatic reactions, there are also important interactions between micronutrients to consider (eg, calcium/vitamin D in musculoskeletal health). Importantly, a significant proportion of the aging population does not meet the recommended intake of many micronutrients.17 Clinical trials on the benefits of micronutrient supplementation have not been conclusive, but adequate intake should be considered an essential component of comprehensive healthcare for older adults.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11571/1364794
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