Background: Contrast associated-acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been associated with adverse outcomes after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, early markers of CA-AKI are still needed to improve risk stratification. We investigated the association between elevated serum uric acid (eSUA) and CA-AKI in patients with STEMI treated with pri-mary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Methods and results: Serum creatinine (Scr) was measured at admission and 24, 48 and 72 h after pPCI. CA-AKI was defined as an increase of 25% (CA-AKI 25%) or 0.5 mg/dl (CA-AKI 0.5) of Scr level above the baseline after 48 h following contrast administration. Multivariable analyses to investigate CA-AKI predictors were performed by binary logistic regression and multivariable backward logistic regression model. In the 3023 patients considered, CA-AKI was more frequent among patients with eSUA as compared with patients with normal SUA levels, considering both CA-AKI definitions (CA-AKI25%: 20.8% vs 16.2%, p < 0.012; CA-AKI 0.5: 10.1% vs 5.8%, p < 0.001). The association between eSUA and CA-AKI was confirmed at multivariable analyses (CA-AKI 25%: odd ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, p = 0.027; CA-AKI 0.5: odd ratio 1.76, 95% CI 1.11-2.79, p = 0.016). Conclusion: Elevated serum uric acid is associated with CA-AKI after reperfusion in patients with STEMI treated with pPCI. (c) 2021 The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Elevated serum uric acid is a predictor of contrast associated acute kidney injury in patient with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Mandurino-Mirizzi, Alessandro;Kajana, Vilma;Cornara, Stefano;Somaschini, Alberto;Galazzi, Marco;Crimi, Gabriele;Ferlini, Marco;Camporotondo, Rita;Gnecchi, Massimiliano
Supervision
;
Ferrario, Maurizio;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Background: Contrast associated-acute kidney injury (CA-AKI) has been associated with adverse outcomes after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, early markers of CA-AKI are still needed to improve risk stratification. We investigated the association between elevated serum uric acid (eSUA) and CA-AKI in patients with STEMI treated with pri-mary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Methods and results: Serum creatinine (Scr) was measured at admission and 24, 48 and 72 h after pPCI. CA-AKI was defined as an increase of 25% (CA-AKI 25%) or 0.5 mg/dl (CA-AKI 0.5) of Scr level above the baseline after 48 h following contrast administration. Multivariable analyses to investigate CA-AKI predictors were performed by binary logistic regression and multivariable backward logistic regression model. In the 3023 patients considered, CA-AKI was more frequent among patients with eSUA as compared with patients with normal SUA levels, considering both CA-AKI definitions (CA-AKI25%: 20.8% vs 16.2%, p < 0.012; CA-AKI 0.5: 10.1% vs 5.8%, p < 0.001). The association between eSUA and CA-AKI was confirmed at multivariable analyses (CA-AKI 25%: odd ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, p = 0.027; CA-AKI 0.5: odd ratio 1.76, 95% CI 1.11-2.79, p = 0.016). Conclusion: Elevated serum uric acid is associated with CA-AKI after reperfusion in patients with STEMI treated with pPCI. (c) 2021 The Italian Diabetes Society, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1463209
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