This mixed-method study aims to analyze how and when employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change may be related to role clarity and resilience and conditional on supervisor support levels. A total of 40 employees participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed that participants perceived differently organizational change, role, supervisor support, and resilience. A total of 178 employees completed questionnaires analyzing perceptions of organizational change, role clarity, resilience, and supervisor support. Quantitative analyses revealed that role clarity mediated the association between employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change and resilience. This relationship was enhanced by supervisor support. Overall, the results suggest that employees who positively perceive organizational change may more easily understand their new role and demands, which is positively related to their resilience. When employees perceive being supported by their supervisors, they are more likely to perceive themselves as resilient, even in the face of organizational change. Our results suggest that organizations should adopt a transparent change management communication plan based on employee involvement. MAD statement This study moves an important step forward in both the change management and resilience literature, as it is the first to examine the mechanisms and boundary conditions explaining how and when employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change may facilitate resilience. By adopting a positive psychology perspective and a mixed-method design, this study identifies role clarity and supervisor support as two important resources that allow employees to benefit from organizational change. As such, it would contribute to providing new insights on how employee resilience can be enabled during organizational change.

A Mixed-method Study on the Bright Side of Organizational Change: Role Clarity and Supervisor Support as Resources for Employees' Resilience

Bernuzzi Chiara
;
Maffoni Marina;Setti Ilaria;Argentero Piergiorgio
2023-01-01

Abstract

This mixed-method study aims to analyze how and when employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change may be related to role clarity and resilience and conditional on supervisor support levels. A total of 40 employees participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis revealed that participants perceived differently organizational change, role, supervisor support, and resilience. A total of 178 employees completed questionnaires analyzing perceptions of organizational change, role clarity, resilience, and supervisor support. Quantitative analyses revealed that role clarity mediated the association between employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change and resilience. This relationship was enhanced by supervisor support. Overall, the results suggest that employees who positively perceive organizational change may more easily understand their new role and demands, which is positively related to their resilience. When employees perceive being supported by their supervisors, they are more likely to perceive themselves as resilient, even in the face of organizational change. Our results suggest that organizations should adopt a transparent change management communication plan based on employee involvement. MAD statement This study moves an important step forward in both the change management and resilience literature, as it is the first to examine the mechanisms and boundary conditions explaining how and when employees’ perceptions of positive organizational change may facilitate resilience. By adopting a positive psychology perspective and a mixed-method design, this study identifies role clarity and supervisor support as two important resources that allow employees to benefit from organizational change. As such, it would contribute to providing new insights on how employee resilience can be enabled during organizational change.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1473694
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