Stroke affects the interconnection between the nervous and immune systems, leading to a downregulation of immunity called stroke-induced immunosuppression (SII). The primary aim of this study is to investigate SII role as a predictor of functional, neurological, and motor outcomes in the neurorehabilitation setting (NRB). We conducted a prospective observational study enrolling postacute stroke patients hospitalized for neurorehabilitation. At NRB admission (T0) and discharge (T1), we assessed presence of SII (defined by a neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥ 5) and we evaluated functional independence (Functional Independence Measure-FIM, Barthel Index-BI), motor performances (Tinetti Score, Hauser Ambulation Index) and neurological impairment (NIHSS). We enrolled 96 patients (45.8% females, 70.6 ± 13.9 years, 88.5% ischemic stroke). At T0, 15.6% of patients (15/96) had SII. When compared to immunocompetent patients (IC), the SII group was characterized by worse baseline functional independence, motor performances and neurological disability. The same was confirmed at T1 (FIM p = 0.012, BI p = 0.007, Tinetti p = 0.034, NIHSS p = 0.001). Neurological disability demonstrated a less pronounced improvement in SII (ΔNIHSS: SII: − 2.1 ± 2.3 vs. IC: − 3.1 ± 2.5, p = 0.035). SII group presented a higher percentage of infectious complications during the neurorehabilitation period (SII 80% vs. IC 25.9%; p = 0.001). SII may represent a negative prognostic factor in the neurorehabilitation setting. SII patients were characterized by poorer functional, motor, neurological performances and higher risk of infectious complications. ClinicaTrial registration: NCT05889169.

The role of stroke-induced immunosuppression as a predictor of functional outcome in the neurorehabilitation setting

Vaghi, Gloria;Piella, Elisa Maria;Avenali, Micol;Martinelli, Daniele;Grillo, Valentina;Corrado, Michele;Bighiani, Federico;Cammarota, Francescantonio;Antoniazzi, Alessandro;Ferrari, Federica;Mazzacane, Federico;Cavallini, Anna;Pichiecchio, Anna;Rognone, Elisa;Martinis, Luca;Correale, Luca;Tassorelli, Cristina;De Icco, Roberto
2024-01-01

Abstract

Stroke affects the interconnection between the nervous and immune systems, leading to a downregulation of immunity called stroke-induced immunosuppression (SII). The primary aim of this study is to investigate SII role as a predictor of functional, neurological, and motor outcomes in the neurorehabilitation setting (NRB). We conducted a prospective observational study enrolling postacute stroke patients hospitalized for neurorehabilitation. At NRB admission (T0) and discharge (T1), we assessed presence of SII (defined by a neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥ 5) and we evaluated functional independence (Functional Independence Measure-FIM, Barthel Index-BI), motor performances (Tinetti Score, Hauser Ambulation Index) and neurological impairment (NIHSS). We enrolled 96 patients (45.8% females, 70.6 ± 13.9 years, 88.5% ischemic stroke). At T0, 15.6% of patients (15/96) had SII. When compared to immunocompetent patients (IC), the SII group was characterized by worse baseline functional independence, motor performances and neurological disability. The same was confirmed at T1 (FIM p = 0.012, BI p = 0.007, Tinetti p = 0.034, NIHSS p = 0.001). Neurological disability demonstrated a less pronounced improvement in SII (ΔNIHSS: SII: − 2.1 ± 2.3 vs. IC: − 3.1 ± 2.5, p = 0.035). SII group presented a higher percentage of infectious complications during the neurorehabilitation period (SII 80% vs. IC 25.9%; p = 0.001). SII may represent a negative prognostic factor in the neurorehabilitation setting. SII patients were characterized by poorer functional, motor, neurological performances and higher risk of infectious complications. ClinicaTrial registration: NCT05889169.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/1499657
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