Background: According to objectification theory, repeated experiences of sexual objectification, illustrated by the portrayal of body in the visual media lead viewers to self–objectify or to adopt a view of themselves as objects whose value is based on physical appearance. Self-objectification is manifested as habitual body surveillance and leads to body shame, which is related to the etiology of eating disorders (ED). Although dysmorphic appearance concern (DAC) is the hallmark of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), several studies found that individuals with ED and BDD exhibit comparable DAC and highlighted how both disorders are variants of a body image disorder. If this is the case, factors that influence the development of ED should also influence the development of BDD. This study investigated whether objectification theory could be used to explain the etiology of BDD in both genders. Methods: A sample of 113 men and 119 women (Mage = 20.60) completed self-report questionnaires. Findings: Women obtained medium scores significantly higher in every variable, with the exception of DAC (both genders were similar). Exposure to objectifying media leads to body surveillance which in turn leads to body shame, that is related to the etiology of BDD in women. Path analyses indicated similar results for men and gender issues were found only in body surveillance if considered as mediator variables. Discussion: The similar levels of DAC may reflect the relatively equal rates of BDD among the genders. In conclusion, it is possible to admit that the objectification theory provides a useful framework for examining BDD

Extension of objectification theory into the realm of body dysmorphic disorder

DAKANALIS, ANTONIOS;ZANETTI, MARIA ASSUNTA;
2011

Abstract

Background: According to objectification theory, repeated experiences of sexual objectification, illustrated by the portrayal of body in the visual media lead viewers to self–objectify or to adopt a view of themselves as objects whose value is based on physical appearance. Self-objectification is manifested as habitual body surveillance and leads to body shame, which is related to the etiology of eating disorders (ED). Although dysmorphic appearance concern (DAC) is the hallmark of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), several studies found that individuals with ED and BDD exhibit comparable DAC and highlighted how both disorders are variants of a body image disorder. If this is the case, factors that influence the development of ED should also influence the development of BDD. This study investigated whether objectification theory could be used to explain the etiology of BDD in both genders. Methods: A sample of 113 men and 119 women (Mage = 20.60) completed self-report questionnaires. Findings: Women obtained medium scores significantly higher in every variable, with the exception of DAC (both genders were similar). Exposure to objectifying media leads to body surveillance which in turn leads to body shame, that is related to the etiology of BDD in women. Path analyses indicated similar results for men and gender issues were found only in body surveillance if considered as mediator variables. Discussion: The similar levels of DAC may reflect the relatively equal rates of BDD among the genders. In conclusion, it is possible to admit that the objectification theory provides a useful framework for examining BDD
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11571/986369
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact